World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 24-March2, 2014

This week a fire destroys a UNO dorm and law enforcement fights the influx of Colorado marijuana: World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 24-March 2, 2014.

Omaha firefighters approach the burning roof of the University of Nebraska Omaha's Scott Village dorms on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014. Omaha fire officials said a discarded cigarette on a second-floor balcony caused the residence-hall fire that displaced 42 students and destroyed their belongings. CHRIS MACHIAN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Omaha firefighters approach the burning roof of the University of Nebraska Omaha’s Scott Village dorms on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014. Omaha fire officials said a discarded cigarette on a second-floor balcony caused the residence-hall fire that displaced 42 students and destroyed their belongings.
CHRIS MACHIAN/THE WORLD-HERALD

See last week’s pictures: World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 17-23, 2014.

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From the Archives: Oscars and Nebraska

Though many movies have been made in Nebraska, only a few have earned Academy Award nominations — or wins.

One of the most beloved of the movies was “Boys Town,” released in 1938. Spencer Tracy won the Oscar for Best Actor and gave the statuette to Boys Town’s Father Flanagan. It, along with other memorabilia from the filming of the movie on the Boys Town campus,  remain on display today.

Spencer Tracy and Mickey Rooney.

Spencer Tracy and Mickey Rooney. METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER

Tracy, who died in 1967, returned to Boys Town at least twice after filming the movie and wrote at least one letter to donors to help raise money for the home. In 2003, he was inducted into Boys Town’s newly established Wall of Fame.

The great grandsons of Spencer Tracy, Sean 11, left, and Shane Tracy 8 pose for pictures with their great grandfather's Oscar from the movie" Boys Town". They were in town for the dedication of the Wall of Fame for which  Spencer Tracy is the first tile. THE WORLD-HERALD

Sean Tracy, 11, left, and Shane Tracy, 8, pose with their great-grandfather’s Oscar from the movie “Boys Town.” Spencer Tracy’s family members were in Omaha for the 2003 dedication of the Wall of Fame. The late actor’s name appears on the first tile. THE WORLD-HERALD

The 1970 movie “Airport” was set in the fictional Lincoln International Airport near Chicago, but part of it was filmed in Lincoln, Nebraska. Helen Hayes won for Best Actress and the movie had nine other nominations, including Best Picture.

Dean Martin and Jacqueline Bisset. UNIVERSAL STUDIOS

Dean Martin and Jacqueline Bisset. UNIVERSAL STUDIOS

Tatum O’Neal is the youngest person to take home an Oscar. She was 10 when she won Best Supporting Actress for the 1973 movie “Paper Moon.” Parts of the movie were filmed near Rulo, Neb., and the Rulo bridge is a featured. O’Neal’s co-star, Madeline Kahn, also was nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

Ryan O'Neal with daughter Tatum. PARAMONT STUDIOS

Ryan O’Neal with daughter Tatum. PARAMOUNT STUDIOS

In 1983, the movie “Terms of Endearment” garnered 11 Academy Award nominations. And the film won five Oscars: Best Picture, Best Actress (Shirley MacLaine), Best Supporting Actor (Jack Nicholson), Best Director (James L. Brooks) and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from another Medium (also Brooks).

Most Nebraskans, however, remember the movie for actress Debra Winger (nominated for Best Supporting Actress) and her romance that developed with then-Gov. Bob Kerrey.

The movie was filmed mostly in Lincoln but also in Kearney.

hirley MacLaine, left, and Debra Winger. PARAMOUNT

Shirley MacLaine, left, and Debra Winger. PARAMOUNT

Omaha native Alexander Payne’s 1999 “Election” was nominated for Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published. The movie launched the acting career of Omahan Chris Klein. The film was shot almost entirely in and around Omaha and Papillion using high school students as extras.

Reese Witherspoon PARAMOUNT/MTV FILMS

Reese Witherspoon as Tracy Flick. PARAMOUNT/MTV FILMS

Another Alexander Payne film, the 2002 “About Schmidt,” earned nods from the Academy with nominations for Best Actor (Jack Nicholson) and Best Supporting Actress (Kathy Bates). Much of that movie was filmed in Omaha.

Kathy Bates and Jack Nicholson. NEW LINE CINEMA

Kathy Bates and Jack Nicholson in “About Schmidt.” NEW LINE CINEMA

The 2009 movie “Up in the Air” received 9 nominations. And while scenes were filmed in Omaha, many did not make the Big Screen.  The DVD version, however, includes deleted scenes shot in the Old Market and at Eppley Airfield.

PARAMOUNT

George Clooney portrays Ryan Bingham. PARAMOUNT

And this year we’ll get to see how our own Alexander Payne will do with his 2013 movie, “Nebraska.” It has been nominated for Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Cinematography, Best Directing and Best Writing Original Screenplay. The black-and-white movie was filmed largely in northeast Nebraska.

Will Forte and Bruce Dern. PARAMOUNT

Will Forte and Bruce Dern. PARAMOUNT

Click here to see a list of all the movies that have been filmed in Nebraska.

Click here to see a slideshow of movies that premiered in Omaha.

Click here for a slideshow that recaps Alexander Payne’s career.

 

 

 

 

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World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 17-23, 2014

This week wrestlers became champions and bighorn sheep were captured in western Nebraska. World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 17-23, 2014.

Omaha Skutt's Korbin Meink hugs coach Brad Hildebrandt after defeating West Point-Beemer's Riley Berg in the Class B 106-pound championship match of the Nebraska state wrestling tournament at the CenturyLink Center Omaha on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014. BRYNN ANDERSON/THE WORLD-HERALD

Omaha Skutt’s Korbin Meink hugs coach Brad Hildebrandt after defeating West Point-Beemer’s Riley Berg in the Class B 106-pound championship match of the Nebraska state wrestling tournament at the CenturyLink Center Omaha on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014.
BRYNN ANDERSON/THE WORLD-HERALD

See last week’s pictures: World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 10-16, 2014.

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From the Archives: Sarah Joslyn

Sarah Joslyn was one of Omaha’s wealthiest women, and the city was the beneficiary when she created a memorial to her late husband, George: the Joslyn Memorial Art Museum.

She died 74 years ago — on Feb. 28, 1940.

1929 World-Herald portrait.

1929 World-Herald portrait.

The Joslyns moved to Omaha in 1880 with nine dollars capital. George did well in real estate and a paper company that soon branched out to supply “ready print” pages for use inside small newspapers.

Their first home was at 2522 Davenport St. Check out the pose for this photograph!

George Joslyn is in the stovepipe hat at left and Sarah is in the center, behind the flowers with her arms folded. JOSLYN ART MUSEUM

George Joslyn is in the stovepipe hat at left and Sarah is in the center, behind the flowers with her arms folded. This photo was taken shortly after they moved to the city in 1880.  THE JOSLYN ART MUSEUM

This is the house before it was torn down in 1968 to make way for the Interstate.

The house was converted to a duplex and the gingerbread trim is torn down, but the carvings in the eaves are still visible.

The house was converted to a duplex and the gingerbread trim is gone, but the carvings in the eaves are still visible. THE WORLD-HERALD

They lived for a time at 2111 Emmet St., but by 1898 they were living on what was soon to become the grounds of the what would become known simply as the Joslyn Castle, then called Sutphen’s Farm. The Joslyns built their mansion at 39th and Davenport in 1903.

Aerial view. In the background are the servant's quarters in 1940. THE WORLD-HERALD

The Joslyn Castle and its spacious grounds. In the background are the servant quarters. THE WORLD-HERALD

E.M. Rogers (inset) clears off almost a mile of sidewalks at the Joslyn home in this 1936 photo. JOHN SAVAGE/THE WORLD-HERALD

E.M. Rogers (inset) clears off almost a mile of sidewalks at the Joslyn home in this 1936 photo. JOHN SAVAGE/THE WORLD-HERALD

 

 Mrs. Joslyn opened the family residence to soldiers in 1917

Sarah Joslyn opened the family residence to soldiers in 1917. THE WORLD-HERALD

A glimpse of the 940 interior with the mystery missing chandelier our reporter Erin Grace wrote about in 2004. The chandelier has never been found. THE WORLD-HERALD

A glimpse of the interior of the home in 1940 features the mystery chandelier our reporter Erin Grace wrote about in 2004. The chandelier has never been found. THE WORLD-HERALD

Click here to read about the mystery of the missing chandelier.

Another special feature: a drinking fountain for the Joslyn pets! (The Joslyns were ardent animal lovers and strong supporters of the Humane Society.)

One of the surprises in the Joslyn home, a drinking fountain, 15 inches deep, for the Joslyn pets...just off the main hall, it is hidden by a heavy curtain." March 5, 1940

One of the surprises in the Joslyn home was a drinking fountain, 15 inches deep, for their  pets. It is just off the main hall and in 1940 was hidden by a heavy curtain. THE WORLD-HERALD 

The Joslyns and their favorite horses, Signal Light and Bay Chief in a turn of the century photo. THE WORLD-HERALD ARCHIVES

The Joslyns and their favorite horses, Signal Light and Bay Chief, in a turn of the 20th century photo. THE WORLD-HERALD ARCHIVES

After George Joslyn died in 1916, Sarah continued their donations — though on a smaller scale.  Instead, by the early 1920s, Sarah was focused on creating a memorial to her husband. She thought about a hospital or children’s home, but settled on something all Omahans could use: an art museum and concert hall.

This photo, dated August 1, 1929, shows the girders of the concert hall going into place. Central High is in the background. ERNEST BIHLER

This photo, dated August 1, 1929, shows the girders of the concert hall going into place. Central High is in the background. ERNEST BIHLER

The museum in 1940. JOHN VAN HOOZER/THE WORLD-HERALD

The museum in 1940. JOHN VAN HOOZER/THE WORLD-HERALD

The couple shared a love of music, and a pipe organ that had been installed in their home was moved to the concert hall at the Joslyn Memorial Art Museum. But it had to be completely rebuilt to increase its volume for a concert hall.

Sarah Joslyn received an honorary doctorate degree on June 3, 1937 from University of Omaha. She was conferred by President Rowland Haynes.

Sarah Joslyn received an honorary doctorate degree on June 3, 1937 from the University of Omaha.

When Sarah Joslyn died Feb. 28, 1940, she was believed to have been 89 years old, thought she had always guarded the secret of her age.

At one point after George’s death in 1916, she was asked why she did not move to California. She replied simply, “The money was made in Omaha, and it will be spent in Omaha.”

To read the full obituary and quite a bit of history, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 10-16, 2014

This week Justin Timberlake plays Omaha and ice fishing in the cool blue light. World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 10-16, 2014.

Justin Timberlake performs at the CenturyLink Center Omaha on Monday, Feb. 10, 2014.  CHRIS MACHIAN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Justin Timberlake performs at the CenturyLink Center Omaha on Monday, Feb. 10, 2014.
CHRIS MACHIAN/THE WORLD-HERALD

See last week’s pictures: World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 3-9, 2014.

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Cleanliness is Next to Godliness for Volunteers

Over the past couple of months I’ve had the pleasure of taking photographs of some of the volunteers that clean Holy Name Catholic Church in Omaha. These volunteers scrub, sweep, mob and vacuum a giant space. The idea for the story came from my youth. I remember my mother and other volunteers cleaning the church in my childhood home of Newell, S.D. Newell, back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, had a population of about 600 people. If work was going to be done at the church, it was going to be done by volunteers. So, I wondered if that happened here in Omaha. It does and reporter Erin Grace made my idea into a great story. Here’s a link to her story and some of my photographs that illustrated it. http://www.omaha.com/article/20140211/NEWS/140219860/1016#grace-holy-name-volunteers-answer-call-to-serve-make-it-their-mission-to-keep-church-clean

Carly Thompson cleans the sacristy at the Holy Name Catholic Church on Monday, Jan. 13, 2014, in Omaha, Neb. Thompson said she has been volunteering as a church clean for six months. She said she enjoys the solitude of cleaning the church. She said the quiet atmosphere gives her a chance to reflect on her faith and her life. RYAN SODERLIN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Carly Thompson cleans the sacristy at the Holy Name Catholic Church on Monday, Jan. 13, 2014, in Omaha, Neb. Thompson said she has been volunteering as a church clean for six months. She said she enjoys the solitude of cleaning the church. She said the quiet atmosphere gives her a chance to reflect on her faith and her life. RYAN SODERLIN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Barbara Rutten, 72, sweeps the floor at the Holy Name Catholic Church on Friday morning, Jan. 3, 2014, in Omaha, Neb. Rutten coordinates a team of volunteers that help to clean the church. Rutten said she has been volunteering as a church cleaner for seven years. RYAN SODERLIN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Barbara Rutten, 72, sweeps the floor at the Holy Name Catholic Church on Friday morning, Jan. 3, 2014, in Omaha, Neb. Rutten coordinates a team of volunteers that help to clean the church. Rutten said she has been volunteering as a church cleaner for seven years. RYAN SODERLIN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Carly Thompson cleans the sacristy at the Holy Name Catholic Church on Monday, Jan. 13, 2014, in Omaha, Neb. Thompson said she has been volunteering as a church clean for six months. She said she enjoys the solitude of cleaning the church. She said the quiet atmosphere gives her a chance to reflect on her faith and her life. RYAN SODERLIN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Carly Thompson cleans the sacristy at the Holy Name Catholic Church on Monday, Jan. 13, 2014, in Omaha, Neb. Thompson said she has been volunteering as a church clean for six months. She said she enjoys the solitude of cleaning the church. She said the quiet atmosphere gives her a chance to reflect on her faith and her life. RYAN SODERLIN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Jane LaHood, 76, dusts a small table at the Holy Name Catholic Church's side chapel on Monday, Feb. 3, 2014. LaHood has been volunteering as a church cleaner for about seven years.  RYAN SODERLIN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Jane LaHood, 76, dusts a small table at the Holy Name Catholic Church’s side chapel on Monday, Feb. 3, 2014. LaHood has been volunteering as a church cleaner for about seven years.
RYAN SODERLIN/THE WORLD-HERALD

Cleaners005

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World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 3-9, 2014.

This week a man overcomes his addictions to run triathlons and snow blankets the Omaha area. World-Herald Week in Pictures: Feb. 3-9, 2014.

Caleb Smidt runs near the intersection of 144th and Pine Streets on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Omaha, as part of his training regimen. Smidt was once homeless and struggling with alcohol and drug addictions, but now he is a triathlete. Smidt said he always runs in the grass because it is easier on his knees.    BRYNN ANDERSON/THE WORLD-HERALD

Caleb Smidt runs near the intersection of 144th and Pine Streets on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2014, in Omaha, as part of his training regimen. Smidt was once homeless and struggling with alcohol and drug addictions, but now he is a triathlete. Smidt said he always runs in the grass because it is easier on his knees.
BRYNN ANDERSON/THE WORLD-HERALD

See last week’s pictures: World-Herald Week in Pictures: Jan. 27-Feb. 2, 2014.

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From the Archives: Where in Omaha IV?

It’s been too long since we have visited Omaha’s past in photos.

Most of these depict fairly familiar locations, but be sure to check out the mystery photo at the end!

(To order prints, phone 402-444-1014 or email OWHstore@owh.com.)

Our 1940 about this undated photo caption read "When the Herald was founded and the above photo was taken from the 'outskirts' at Eighteenth and Douglas streets, Omaha was a city of mud streets, hills, and hallows." THE WORLD-HERALD

This 1865 photo of Omaha was taken from the “outskirts” at 18th and Douglas Streets, looking east to the Missouri River. At the time, Omaha was described as a city of mud streets, hills and hallows. The photo was reprinted in October 1940, part of a special report marking the 75th anniversary of the founding of the Omaha Herald. Gilbert M. Hitchcock, founder of the Omaha Daily World in 1885, purchased the Omaha Herald in 1889 to create the Omaha World-Herald.
WORLD-HERALD ARCHIVE

the 1938 caption read : "General Lowe, first mayor of Omaha, operated this drug store on the present site of the Securities building, Sixteenth and Farnam Streets, The three men and a boy were employees: left to right, William Parker, Frank Brewster, Louis Swoboda and Henry J. Cashman." The oicture was taken in 1892.

Jesse Lowe, who was elected Omaha’s first mayor in 1857, operated this drug store at 16th and Farnam Streets.  The photo, taken in 1892, shows some of his employees standing in front of the doors. The current city hall, just a few blocks west of this location, has a conference room named for Lowe. WORLD-HERALD ARCHIVE

16th & Farnam Streets, looking north in 1911. THE LOUIS BOSTWICK COLLECTION

 

Omahans gathered at 17th & Farnam to hear a speech by Hitler broadcast from Nurnburg, Germany in November of 1938. JOHN SAVAGE/THE WORLD-HERALD

Omahans gather at 17th & Farnam Streets to listen to a radio broadcast of a speech by Adolph Hitler in Nuremberg, Germany in the fall of 1938. JOHN SAVAGE/THE WORLD-HERALD

 

81st Street, looking north to Pacific Street on  March 2, 1939. EARLE BUNKER/THE WORLD-HERALD

81st Street looking north to Pacific Street on March 2, 1939. EARLE BUNKER/THE WORLD-HERALD

 

This 1953 photo shows the first concrete being poured for the Northwest Radial Highway. The view is to the northwest from 47th Street and Military Avenue. JOHN SAVAGE/THE WORLD-HERALD

 

And here is the mystery photo, dated March 18, 1936. I love highway kitsch and searched in vain for any information about this structure. Any ideas? Please send them to jolene.mchugh@owh.com

The Tired Tower, where sandwiches are only 10 cents! THE WORLD-HERALD ARCHIVES

The Tired Tower, where sandwiches are only 10 cents! WORLD-HERALD ARCHIVE

 

Here are links to the other Where in Omaha posts:

Where in Omaha?

Where in Omaha II?

Where in Omaha III?

 

 

 

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World-Herald Week in Pictures: Jan. 27-Feb. 2, 2014

This week a man injured in an industrial accident heals and a Medal of Honor winner speaks. World-Herald Week in Pictures: Jan. 27-Feb. 2, 2014.

As the pigskin grafts used to heal Erik Ocampo's skin dry out, his wife, Alison, must cut them away before cleaning his face at their Omaha home on Friday, January 31, 2014. Ocampo was burned in an industrial accident at International Nutrition on Monday, Jan. 20. The accident killed two of his coworkers.  KENT SIEVERS/THE WORLD-HERALD

As the pigskin grafts used to heal Erik Ocampo’s skin dry out, his wife, Alison, must cut them away before cleaning his face at their Omaha home on Friday, January 31, 2014. Ocampo was burned in an industrial accident at International Nutrition on Monday, Jan. 20. The accident killed two of his coworkers.
KENT SIEVERS/THE WORLD-HERALD

See last week’s pictures: Omaha World-Herald Week in Pictures: Jan. 20-26, 2014.

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World-Herald Week in Pictures: Jan. 20-26, 2014.

This week we had an industrial accident and a celebration of life. Omaha World-Herald Week in Pictures: Jan. 20-26, 2014.

This was the scene of an industrial accident at the International Nutrition plant on Monday, Jan. 20, 2014. The plant, which manufactured animal feed supplements, was located near the intersection of 76th and F streets.  BRYNN ANDERSON/THE WORLD-HERALD

This was the scene of an industrial accident at the International Nutrition plant on Monday, Jan. 20, 2014. The plant, which manufactured animal feed supplements, was located near the intersection of 76th and F streets.
BRYNN ANDERSON/THE WORLD-HERALD

See last week’s pictures: World-Herald Week in Pictures: Jan. 13-19, 2014.

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